Tag Archives: tests

Transplant Day 29 and some gut rest

Well last night was frustrating. The nursing staff was spread thin because of the holiday and it took a lot longer than usual for them to respond to the non-critical things. From 10-11 p.m. one of Patrick’s antibiotics ended and the pump alarm rang and there was no one to shut it off. I silenced it for a while, but Patrick insisted that it was the nurse’s job and my job was just to cuddle and talk to him. How can you argue with that?

Unfortunately, the nurses were trying not to bother him while he slept, so every time Patrick woke, they’d try to come in and do vitals. Problem is, that mean they were in the room half an hour each of those times and we were awake at midnight and 5 and 5:30. (Not complaining about nursing… just stating trouble with sleep that comes with not doing well.) Then, at 6 Patrick’s nurse came to deliver the news that the resident didn’t want to come drain his gut again “unless he’s really uncomfortable.” Well – 10 minutes later, Patrick woke up crying. He said “bucket” and, before I could react, he threw up all over everything.

Yes – uncomfortable. Apparently, with nothing moving out of his gut and feeds still moving in, Patrick’s gut and belly had finally had enough.

So we got him up and changed the bed and gave him a bath and turned on some Blues Clues. And we waited for the doctors to come for rounds.

Rounds were actually kind of a relief today. They talked about different causes for this new problem and tests that could look for those problems. They aren’t thinking rejection at this point.. perhaps some inflammation or something called an ileus where the gut just temporarily stops moving or a mechanical issue with the muscle wall around Patrick’s stoma or a type of irritation called pneumatosis.

Then, Dr. Mercer came into the room to try out draining Patrick’s belly himself. When he saw how little a catheter needed to go in to immediately drain, he was actually really relieved. He said that ruled out a lot of possible problems. It also eliminated the perceived huge risk of draining. He showed Brian then and there and wrote orders that the nursing staff or parents could do that as often as needed.

They also stopped feeds, restarted TPN, put Patrick’s g-tube to suction so he wouldn’t have to throw up any more, switched as many medication as possible to their IV forms, and ordered some tests. The rest of the morning was very busy. Patrick had an x-ray of his abdomen and then later a CT scan to look specifically for pneumatosis or any other narrowings or problems. I guess we did a good job selling the idea of how fun a CT can be because Patrick had already been asking if he’d get to go in the “donut” again. We got comments from the radiology staff and nurse about how comfortable he was doing something that terrifies most other children.

Patrick and daddy in a wheelchair headed to CT

Patrick and daddy in a wheelchair headed to CT

Later today, they’ll come do an ileoscopy (scope through the stoma) and biopsy again.

Hopefully, one of these tests will show us what is going on. It is possible that Patrick’s belly just needs to rest and reset after all of the trauma of last week.

Regardless, with symptoms alleviated, the rest of yesterday was a good day. Without pain, Patrick was feeling up to sitting up and playing more. (In fact, he was more than a little afraid of his bed after all the scary things that had happened there this past few days, so he was doing all he could to get me to let him be in other places.) This means that his lungs have opened up and he was able to wean off of oxygen. His lungs are still recovering and they are trying to get the fluid all the way out of them and the lungs totally reinflating. His oxygen saturation is a little bit low and he sets off alarms when he sleeps, but he quickly rebounds and no one comes running at this point.

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Having family here definitely lifted his spirits, too. He and I were both worn out and frustrated and mad yesterday. It would have been a hard day had just the two of us been trying to be together. But Patrick’s family made him feel like a million bucks. Really, seeing the pride in his eyes when I came back from doing laundry (it was a big laundry day) at having his uncle all to himself was impressive. And seeing him happy and laughing as he played with his cousins was a big treat, too. This little boy needs people and fun.

Brian went with Mark’s family to the zoo in the afternoon and Patrick and I took a much needed nap and some quiet individual play time.. But then they came back and we played in the playroom and went out to a break room to eat dinner.. and then back into the room for another priesthood blessing. (Patrick asked if Mark could help daddy give him one.) Then they gave him some gifts, including a ball that was then used to play monkey in the middle. He laughed and laughed.

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When they left, I let him stay up and watch some of his new Dora DVD while we finished up his care and I got ready for bed.

I’m finishing this blog post up in the morning. Patrick has slept soundly all night. X-ray snuck in at 5:30. (Patrick’s nurse is fairly mad they did because she guards to be sure they don’t wake patients who don’t need it.) Patrick was really upset about it, but then tucked up his arms under my side and went back to sleep. A little later they came to draw labs, saw his bed needed cleaned up, and the same happened.

After such a long and hard week, it is so good to see him comfortable and sleeping peacefully. Hoping that goes a long way towards a better day today.

Patrick’s days are busy right now. He starts the day with labs at 5:30 and a chest x-ray at the latest moment that the nurses will allow to get him sleep but still get the results on time for rounds. He has meds at 7 and at 9, and because he doesn’t feel well, that means running zofram for nausea first. He has 2 antibiotics each given 3 times a day with a benadryl pretreatment before. He has respiratory therapy 3 times a day. He has vitals every 6 hours. And diapers. And stoma care. And a bath. And pain management. And getting up to walk. And trying not to go stir crazy.

It’s been 4 weeks since transplant. One thing we know from this journey.. So much can change in a day, or week, or month. We really appreciate all of the ongoing support and love that you offer Patrick, near or far.

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Not again!

Here’s the ultimate test of the value of the switch to wordpress. I am trying a quick blog to update everyone everywhere about what’s going on.

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Taken a couple of weeks ago, during our last admission. He’s watching the construction going on outside the window.

So, quick version.. About 3 weeks ago Patrick had a really bad few days. His stomach was upset. He had a hard time concentrating. He was in a BAD mood and into everything. It went on long enough that even though his labwork didn’t show any signs of trouble, I requested a set of blood cultures and skipped a nap to drive all the way to the hospital to get them done.

And then, that night, as I was getting Patrick ready for bed, I checked his temperature and discovered he had a fever. We called his doctor and came up to the hospital.

We were here 6 days, our longest stay in over a year, because it took forever to get the infection to respond to the treatment. (For various reasons I may or may not expound on later.) And because it took an extra long time to get the right antibiotic dose. It was a frustrating stay because he never got horribly sick, but he had staph epi in his line and it’s notoriously hard to clear. And the longer it took to clear, the more the doctors wanted to try a different approach (understandably.)

And, well, because the night shift just couldn’t manage to help him sleep through the night. But that’s a gripe for another day.

I’m afraid I jinxed us. One of the dramatic changes the doctors wanted to do to be sure to clear the infection was to switch from using ethanol to using vancomycin, a targeted antibiotic, to protect the line.

I raised more than a little bit of a stink. I insisted that we still use ethanol at least 4 hours a day. I made the attending come discuss it with me. And I won.

But i felt guilty. And when we went home, I did my best to follow doctors orders and put a heavy preference on vanco locks over ethanol.

Fastforward to today. For the 2 weeks since bringing Patrick home, I’ve been giving antibiotics every 8 hours.. including a dose at midnight. Tonight was supposed to be our last night.

Patrick’s cousins are in town and we’ve been having a grand family party. Aquarium trip. Hiking in the mountains. And today they rented a bounce house.

Patrick and I were very excited about today. Only one matter of business to take care of. A visit to his physical therapist. We have been waiting for MONTHS for a new DAFO (brace) for his foot to help with his worsening muscle tightness. And, Patrick has been dying to show his therapist how he’s learned to ride a tricycle.

Well – we got to the therapy office. And we got in the elevator. And Patrick’s breathing got a little shallow. And he gave a little shiver. And a hundred memories rushed back into my mind and I knew something was wrong. I remembered what a bad and out of sorts day he had yesterday, how his tummy was upset, how he had a hard time concentrating and kept getting into trouble.

So the elevator doors opened and I didn’t get off. Pushed the down button and went straight to the family clinic on the first floor. And I asked for a thermometer.

A nurse came out and checked and at first his temp was normal, but she rechecked and got 99.0. In his low ear.

So, we hopped in the elevator and went back upstairs to cancel our appointment.

Patrick was distraught. He didn’t want to be sick. He wanted to see Miss Holly.

Well, Miss Holly came out and I explained what was happening and she explained that the brace company had rejected the cast we’d sent as a model for his foot and asked her to recast. If we missed this appointment, it would be another month without a brace.

So – we made a deal. I’d call the hospital, she’d cast his foot to get a mold for the brace. Patrick would, well, try to cry more quietly.

By the time we left the therapy office, Patrick was sold on going to the hospital. So, we hurried home. Checked a temp. 101.8 this time. 15 minutes later. I grabbed the transplant go bag because I didn’t want to waste time packing, gave him some tylenol, and we booked it up to the ER.

The tylenol worked. Mostly. His fever was the same when we arrived.

And so, here we are. We are antibiotics to cover all the major bacteria, and an antifungal. I threw a bit of a momma bear tantrum when they tried to tell me they didn’t think we needed the antibiotic that kills his recurring kleibsiella bacteria.

He doesn’t feel well. He is tired. He only napped for 10 minutes. We have tried going for walks and in the end, he just prefers to lay in the bed.

And so, here we are. Hoping culture results are fast and clear. Hoping we are giving him the right drugs. Wondering how we’re going to make tomorrow bearable.

Just like every summer.

Mid-July rolls around and I start to get nervous. And I hate that we are here because I don’t want to be superstitious about certain months. But for some reason, summers are always hard for Patrick.

And so, I’m quite discouraged tonight. I am sad to be missing out on my first-of-the season tomatoes that I harvested this week and the green beans on my plants waiting for harvest and the great big yummy yellow zucchini sitting in the fridge. I hate that Patrick and I had finally hit our stride again, finally had a routine again, finally were catching up on the chores again. (Does anyone want to iron a month’s worth of dress shirts?)… And now we are starting over all over again.

But at least it is 10:30 and I can go to sleep because tonight giving the antibiotics on time is someone else’s responsibility.

All too familiar

Here we are again. Back at Primary Children’s hospital – battling yeast yet again.

Sunday morning, Patrick developed a fever. It started low, but after a couple of hours, it was evident that he didn’t feel well. It seemed to both Brian and myself that he was trying to communicate with us that he wasn’t feeling well and needed help.

We’d made it through 2 hours of church, but decided it best to leave before Sacrament meeting was over. We got home, took his temperature – 101.4 – and he was starting to have chills. So we packed up and headed to the E.R. as quickly as possible.

Once we arrived, things were pretty much the usual drill.. they gave him some Motrin, took his history, drew blood cultures and started antibiotics and antifungals.

It didn’t take long for us to get into a room. But we started out right away with excitement. Before the nurse had even finished her initial assessment, Brian noticed hives forming next to Patrick’s ears. Within 5 minutes he was covered with hives from head to toe and his lips and eyes were starting to swell. They turned off the antifungal medicine and the reaction stopped and started to reverse. We think that they ran that medicine faster than his body’s used to and it caused the reaction, but it was a very scary moment to think that our preferred antifungal medication might suddenly have become off limits.

That night, Patrick was really, really sick. His fever reached over 104 degrees and he was sick to his stomach. We barely slept at all. The only rest he got was if he had both Tylenol and Motrin in his system. The problems continued through the next day and the antibiotics and antifungals didn’t seem to be making much difference until afternoon when his fever finally broke for the first time.. But his blood cultures stayed negative all day.

Around 8 p.m. a doctor came to visit us, though, and gave us results. Patrick has yeast in his bloodstream again.

The rest isn’t unexpected, but that doesn’t make it easier. Today’s been scary, stressful, and exhausting. Especially since Patrick is not cooperating with me about sleeping in his bed and neither one of us has had a good night’s sleep since we got here.

We talked to the doctors early and they confirmed that we needed to pull out his line. They also explained that Patrick’s spleen, yet again, is sequestering platelets and his blood counts are falling to dangerous levels. This means transfusions again with all the potential complications that come with that.

We spent the morning getting a little more settled in. Social work and child life came to visit. Child life talked about ways that we can help Patrick to be less afraid while he’s here. They brought him a baby doll with a little oxygen mask and blood pressure cuff to show him that they’re ok. He gave the doll lots of kisses and snuggles.. But took the blood pressure cuff off.. I think he was protecting it. They came along to all the following tests and surgery, too, to help minimize the trauma of these procedures. This was a new experience, but he seemed to enjoy it.

We went down to ultrasound around noon. They were looking for fungal balls in his organs. The poor radiology tech and radiologist were very confused trying to understand the anatomy they were seeing. I tried to explain that his gut looks funny and that his gall bladder is so small it’s almost invisible.. but they still were pretty sure his small intestine was his gall bladder. As we were leaving, the technician said “He looks so healthy, though”.. implying that on the insides he looks far from healthy.

When we got back from ultrasound Brian was waiting for us. He’d been given the afternoon off of work to come help. I was so grateful he was here!

We hurried and got ready for surgery. Just as we were about ready, the resident from the infectious disease team came to examine Patrick and take a history. Surgery showed up to take us down before he’d finished his exam. Patrick was jumping on the bed. I said to Brian “He’s just jumping because he knows he’s about to loose his foot”, referring to the fact that he’d come back from surgery with an IV in at least one foot. The guy from surgery looked up and said “Wait. What? Do I have the wrong kid?” We had a good laugh after that.

We went down to surgery with the child life specialist and infectious disease doctor in tow. After talking to the anesthesiologist, we sent Patrick on his way in a crib full of toys. Then we sat down to finish the history with infectious disease. Before we finished, Patrick’s surgeon came in.

Dr. Rollins, the surgeon, talked to us about what a dangerous situation we are in as Patrick is running out of more and more places to put lines. We’re aware of this, but hearing it vocalized by our surgeon made it all the more real.

Worse yet, he called from the OR as they were trying to place peripheral IV’s to tell us that they couldn’t get them in and to ask my permission to put in a “shallow central” line in his leg or neck. Apparently, they’d stuck him 8 times attempting to place a peripheral IV.

In the end, though, they got 2 peripheral IV’s in. Infectious disease didn’t like the idea of using a central line at all and asked them not to leave one in. So we find ourselves in a scary position now. Patrick needs IV’s for his nutrition and medication. He also needs to have labwork drawn to keep a close eye on his fragile health.. and we don’t know where else they can get needles in.

After talking to the surgeon, they let me go back to the recovery room where I found Patrick just by following his screams. He was hysterical and they told me that the anesthesiologist had prescribed me as his pain medicine. So I sat and rocked him and eventually got from screams to whimpers to sleeping.. But that was the situation for the next 5 hours or so. Patrick screamed bloody murder whenever anyone but me or Brian touched him. He was only content being held and rocked by one of us.

He just woke up about half an hour ago, though.. and for once seems back to himself. They gave him medicine for nausea and started his last transfusion of the day and it seems to have him finally feeling better. The best news is that he doesn’t have a fever.

Right now, he and his daddy and playing with toys in his crib. He’s not 100%, but doing ok for now.

Prayers for IV’s to last, for veins to be found when needed, and for Patrick to feel comfort in a very scary situation would be appreciated.

The attending from infectious disease explained that they don’t think this is the result of an untreated infection. The previous infection didn’t grow back. Instead they think these infections are coming from his gut.. and we don’t know how to stop that for now.

A lot is still up in the air. I’ll post more as I know it.

Results of today’s tests and surgery

Today’s been a pretty busy day. Patrick went at 9:30 to have an upper GI study today. They put a contrast solution into his stomach through his G-tube and then watched it move through his intestines. He’s had this test done a couple of times and the results are always quite interesting to see. As we knew, Patrick’s small intestine was quite fat and stretched out and his large intestine was pretty narrow, though not as narrow as I remember it being last September.

At the end of the study, the radiologist compared today’s images to the ones taken in September. Her result: “No significant change”. Yup, that’s right folks.. all that worry revealed that they officially discovered that Patrick’s anatomy is just as we expected it would be 6 months after his reconnection.

They are still wondering if this odd anatomy is to blame for some of the recent infections. (Bacteria or yeast from the gut leaking into the bloodstream through thin walls).. but are going to watch for a while to see rather than taking immediate action.

So – this afternoon Patrick had a new central line placed. This one has two lumens, meaning there are two tubes so you can put incompatible things in at the same time without them mixing like antifungals and TPN. We’ll be starting a new therapy hopefully tomorrow, too, where we fill the unused lumen with a solution that helps kill bacteria and fungus.

We’re still waiting for a plan to move forward from here. For some reason, even though little has changed anatomically, they’re acting as though something major was still wrong and therefore trying to make changes to diet, etc. I’m having to go all out working as Patrick’s advocate right now.. fighting for people to think things through and decide what’s best for Patrick based on himself, not on general rules and practices.

It’s exhausting work, so since he’s sleeping, I think I will too. Hopefully it’s a calm, restful night and I’ll be ready to get up and start pushing for a discharge plan tomorrow.

Possible Bowel Obstruction

For the past few days, Patrick has had a really swollen, sore belly. A lot of it has to do with his spleen and how big it gets when he’s sick or when he gets a transfusion. He’s had both this week and so his spleen was really big.

However, with a yeast infection, there’s a chance of the infections building up inside an organ and causing similar symptoms. So, yesterday Patrick went for a CT scan. The findings weren’t fungal balls or absesses.. in fact, they weren’t what we expected at all.

Yesterday afternoon a doctor came to tell us that they’d seen evidence of a possible bowel obstruction. He then went on to describe findings that were kind of confusing to us. Basically, he explained that Patrick’s intestines were very dilated before an obstruction and very narrow after it.. kind of like when you blow up one of those long balloons and the air doesn’t go all the way to the end of the balloon.

The reason this confused us is that it sounded exactly like a description of the problem of a narrow colon that we’d discovered after Patrick’s ostomy was taken down. We didn’t know if the findings were new or if they were just telling us what we already knew.

Yesterday the GI attending and the surgeon, Dr. Rollins, who’d reconnected Patrick’s intestines back in September sat down and looked at the images together. In the end, the decision was that Patrick’s small intestine is much more stretched out than it previously was and that the place where the small and large intestine were sewn together is still very, very narrow and probably is the cause. (Like if you were to pinch your long balloon so the air can’t pass through all the way to the end.)

Now the question remains if this is something new or not. It’s possible that the surgical site has scarred making the connection even more narrow and unflexible.

Tomorrow morning, they’ll do another study where they put contrast into his belly and watch it move through to his intestines. If they find that the opening is about the same size at it was after surgery, they probably won’t do anything about it right now. However, if they find significant narrowing, then Patrick will probably have surgery tomorrow night or sometime Tuesday. They’ll take the scarred section out, taper down the small intestine to make it a better fit to the narrow colon, and sew the two back together.

Both the GI and the surgeon are saying that they think it unlikely that this problem is completely new or that Patrick will need the surgery. However, they want to prevent bigger problems in the future for him, if they can. So – they’ll do the study and then we’ll talk about it.

Either way, Patrick should be able to get a new central line in the next couple of days. They’ll try to put in a “double lumen” meaning that two tubes go into the vein, instead of one. The double access will make it easier to give antibiotics and antifungals and might make it possible to help prevent them by treating the unused lumen with medicines to prevent infection.

I’ll do my best to keep you updated here as we find out more.

Update: Two weeks (and a day) after surgery

Well, it’s been another week. Most people are surprised to learn that we are still at the hospital. Well, we did think that the recovery would be no more than two weeks.

But here we are.

It turns out that Patrick’s large intestine is needing much more time to adapt than was anticipated. The problem is that, never having been used, first it had to wake up, and then it has to stretch back to a normal size.

They did a contrast enema today. That means they squirted contrast in Patrick’s bottom and then watched on X-ray as it moved up through his large intestine, and then his small intestine.

The good news is that it moved through without problems. There are no obstructions or strictures. The bad news is that, well, it still resembles a long noodle more than a colon. And it’s fitted to a small intestine that is quite stretched out.

So the stretched out, and therefore weaker, small intestine is trying to push things through a super tight large intestine (imagine a balloon that hasn’t yet been inflated). And it’s just not working very well.

I’ll talk to Patrick’s surgeon tomorrow about the study and see if there is anything more that can be done. So far, though, the answer I’m given most often is that we just need to wait. Hopefully time and use will balance things out.

In the meantime, we just keep waiting here. I don’t know quite what to do with myself. Without feeding, ostomy, IV’s (I’m not allowed to touch them), or even diapers really, there isn’t much in the way of my normal nursing duties to do. So I’m trying to spend my time just being a mom… playing with Patrick and helping with the basic things like sleep, comfort, and cuddles.

The good news is that Patrick actually feels quite well, as long as we don’t let too much build up in his stomach. And this lends itself to fun new adventures like baths in a bathtub and learning to sit.

It’s not the easiest thing being cooped up in this tiny crowded room together with nurses going in and out all the time. We get a bit bored of each other sometimes. But we’re doing the best we can and just praying that Patrick’s body is up for the challenge it’s been given.

A day in the life . . .

Things have been pretty calm since we brought Patrick home from the hospital this time. It takes a lot of extra work to keep up on all the new medications he needs, but otherwise life has been calm.

But – it occurs to me that I should state that our calm isn’t exactly the same as others’ calm. Let’s take today as an example. It was a pretty good day.

We got up early today. Patrick woke about hourly through the night because he’s still not used to being at home. I get up and give him a pacifier and put his blankets back on him and he goes right to sleep. I was a bit tired when the alarm went off at 6 to tell me Patrick’s vancomyacin was due. I’d forgotten to take it out of the fridge last night, so I had to run around with it tucked under my arm to get it warm while I got everything else ready.

I prepared a bottle. Disconnected Patrick’s feeding tube, replacement fluids line and ostomy drainage tube. By then he was screaming to be fed so I got him out of the crib and fed him his 1/3 tsp. of formula then rocked him back to sleep. (And me, too). At 7:30 I put him back down to check to make sure Howie was up.

He was pretty awake then, so I went ahead and got him up, changed his ostomy bag and g-tube dressing, flushed his picc line, and got him dressed.

Because we were up so early I decided that it was a good day to go shopping. It’s Howie’s birthday on Sunday so I packed a bottle to give myself extra time to shop. (Patrick eats every 3 hours, which can be a narrow window of opportunity).

I’d been in the store about half an hour when my cell phone rang. It was Patrick’s nurse confirming an appointment for her to come draw blood for labs. It was 11:30 and she wanted to come at 12:15. So I made a mad scramble to focus and finish the grocery shopping so I could get home on time.

At 12 we finally made it out of Wal-mart and I loaded Patrick and the groceries into the car, then shut off his TPN pumps so that the labs would be accurate. (Need to give the blood time to carry off what’s in the PICC line.) I hurried home and just got the groceries into the house and put away and Patrick fed when his nurse knocked on the door.

I gathered up the supplies she’d need for the tests then held him while she drew them. She asked what his last temperature had been, and since I hadn’t taken once since he woke up, she did. It read 99.5.

Any rise in temperature can be an early sign of infection so I stuck a thermometer in my pocket to do temp checks every half hour. Then I took him upstairs to change his diaper only to discover his ostomy bag had leaked. He was pretty mad, but I pulled off a quick change and took his temperature again.. Still high.

I grabbed a quick lunch and put on replacement fluids (saline solution via IV). He needed some anyway and if he runs a fever he needs extra hydration. By then he was getting quite mad and so I piled everything to work on his tubing change around me and snuggled him up in my lap to try to help him sleep.

At 2 I traded replacement fluids for IV antibiotics, and when those were done, started prepping the new day’s TPN. When I opened up the backpack around 2:30 to see what time I had left in the day’s TPN program, I noticed a bad mistake. I’d failed to turn the pumps back on after the blood draw.

Without TPN running, Patrick’s blood sugar plummets, so I hurried and got him a bottle and then gave him a couple of licks of a glucose tablet to help keep him up. I made a record fast tubing change then reprogrammed the pumps to slowly “taper up” the rate of infusion to avoid going from very low blood sugar to something too high.

Finally with TPN running again, Patrick calmed down. But his temp was still between 99 & 99.5. My next option was to try to get him to rest. So we snuggled up on the couch so he would sleep. He’d sleep as long as I was right there holding him. So, while he slept, I talked to his transplant coordinator in Seattle and then sent an e-mail to his GI here to try to get sorted out a positive blood culture that showed up in his labwork last week.

The evening was calmer. Brian worked a bit late which gave me extra time to get dinner ready.

Around 8 we started working on the bedtime routine. One of Patrick’s meds needs to be given on an empty stomach so he gets that around 8:30. Then Brian and I work together to make new formula & bottles for the night and to prime the tubing for the feeding pump that drips formula into his stomach all night. He gets one antibiotic through his g-tube right now. We have to draw it out of a vial with a syringe and then change tips to something that fits his feeding tube and flush it in there.

Then we connect his feeding tube, flush his PICC line to make sure it’s still running well, and change him into P.J.’s. Tonight he gets to sleep in a onesie to help keep his temperature down, though.

At 9, Patrick ate and then curled up and went to sleep. Because Brian was home, we stayed up watching T.V. while we gave antibiotics. He gets 3 at night, plus more replacement fluids. We have to switch medicines and flush lines at 9:30, 10:00 and 11:00 p.m.

And that is why I’m up blogging right now. His last antibiotics are just finishing up, so I need to go take them off and make sure that the unused line is “heparinized” for the night. If I’m quiet, I hope to do it without waking him and make it to bed by midnight.

It sounds like a lot, but this has actually been a mostly relaxing day.. except the part in the middle when Patrick’s TPN was off and he felt awful. Last temp was actually low… so I hope that the other high numbers were a result of the heat of the day or the fact that he’s cutting a few teeth.