Mrs. Hoopes Goes to Washington

**Disclaimer: I know you all want to read about our much bigger news. However, I had this post all but written before I got busy with Halloween and birthday planning last week. So, I figured I might as well finish it up and hit post. I promise I am following tonight with other news, too.
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Our family did something that, for us, was completely upside down last week. I went on a trip. And I left Patrick home with his Dad. I recognize that this is not unusual in the world we live in. However, it is incredibly unusual for the primary caregiver of a home infusion patient to travel without them is very unusual.

Let’s start by saying that we survived. In fact, I think it was good for all of us.

A few months ago, I was invited to attend a research panel on the subject of lost Central Line Access. This came through a doctor who I had e-mailed a few times because of my support group and later because of the troubles we have had in placing a line in Patrick.

At first, the idea seemed a bit crazy. But the more I thought about it, the more important it sounded. Here a group of experts was gathering to help try to figure out how to research and solve the exact problem that is putting my son’s life in jeopardy. Why wouldn’t I take the chance to go meet them and contribute to the discussion.

Well, why, except that we’d have to pay my way and have Brian take time off to fill in with me while I was away. As we discussed it, we decided it was a really good idea for me to try to go. (Brian also thought the break would be good for me.)

So, last Sunday I snuck out of church early and headed to the airport. I got picked for expedited screening at the airport and made it to my gate in under 30 minutes. Then I looked around and thought “Well, how what am I supposed to do with myself?” Remember that usually when I fly, we spend something around half an hour in security alone, and then we have to repack bags, change a diaper, gate check our stroller, and make arrangements for early boarding. Oh, entertain a very active child while keeping his IV tubing safe.

That Sunday was one of the longest and quietest in my memory. I read books, watched movies, played video games, sent e-mails, checked on Facebook, worked on a birthday video and still had time to spare. I finally made it to my room, called home, and then went to bed a little after midnight.

Morning seemed to come too early, but without anyone else to get ready, I was still dressed and ready with time to kill.

The panel itself was amazing. I tried taking notes, decided writing was too slow, switched to a computer and filled 12 pages. I learned so much about what might cause patients to lose central line access. I am itching for this panel to bring forth fruit in the form of better understanding of how to keep patients from losing central line access quickly the way that Patrick did. I can’t go into details about the research plan that was decided upon.. but I can say that it is a huge but simple step that could lead to so much better understanding, and with better understanding comes better care.

It was also an amazing experience to be in a room filled with these brilliant medical minds. I got to sit with and get to know better many of the people responsible for designing and manufacturing central lines. I came home with a stack of business cards and am already working on hopefully becoming a little bit more of a patient advocate in this area.

And then, when the conference ended, I took a cab into Washington D.C. I spent the evening and morning playing tourist. (Only getting myself lost a couple of times and never irreversibly) before time to come home.

On the flight home, I sat next to a talkative man who had been all over the world. We compared travels and experiences and opinions. When we landed, another man asked me what my career was that allowed me to be so well traveled. When I told him I was a stay at home mom of a special needs child his jaw about hit the floor. For some reason, that gave me a bit of an ego boost. I think I sometimes feel like I disappear a bit in this important but unlauded role.

Being away from Patrick and Brian was an eye opening experience. I think it was for them as well. I think we all like our roles. (Though, I’ll admit, it was hard to come back home and dive right in.) I think we can go several more years before sending Mom away on another big trip. But it was really fun to stretch my wings and remember what it’s like to be just me for a while.

 

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